Eating Stone: Imagination and the Loss of the Wild

Eating Stone: Imagination and the Loss of the Wild Review

Long believed to be disappearing and possibly even extinct, the Southwestern bighorn sheep of Utah’s canyonlands have made a surprising comeback. Naturalist Ellen Meloy tracks a band of these majestic creatures through backcountry hikes, downriver floats, and travels across the Southwest. Alone in the wilderness, Meloy chronicles her communion with the bighorns and laments the growing severance of man from nature, a severance that she feels has left us spiritually hungry. Wry, quirky and perceptive, Eating Stone is a brillant and wholly original tribute to the natural world.

Title:Eating Stone: Imagination and the Loss of the Wild
Edition Language:English

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    Eating Stone: Imagination and the Loss of the Wild Reviews

  • Michael

    One of those books that all riders on the planet would do well to consider reading. Meloy writes of a year spent with bighorn sheep in the mountains of southern Utah where she lived, with side trips t...

  • Jeanette

    "Where is the water? I describe a confluence of rivers hidden in folds of stone, a spring on the side of the mountain in land so holy, you must sing every footstep you place on it."The concept for thi...

  • Rift Vegan

    The writing in this book is beautiful... I seriously wanted my kindle in one hand and a paintbrush in the other because I'm sure my paintings would be as beautiful as the desert scenes Ellen Meloy pai...

  • Caleb

    This was an unexpected and disappointing miss for me. Perhaps it's the books description, or perhaps I should have anticipated prose mirroring "The Anthropology of Turquoise" that I fell in love with ...

  • Brittany

    I find sheep to be dull creatures. I say this as a dedicated conservationist, and one who firmly believes that all organisms have an innate right to exist, or at least to exist for as long as they can...

  • Sophy H

    3.5 stars I'm not sure about this book if I'm entirely honest. I absolutely loved The Anthropology of Turquoise and would put it down as one of my all time favourites. So I was deeply looking forward ...

  • Michael Livingston

    A year spent with wild longhorn sheep and a moving treatise on wildness and its disappearance from the world....

  • Issy

    Finally finished this one. It's as dense as a thicket of nature and just as enjoyable. Everytime I glazed over something, eavesdropping in the subway say, she brought me right back in with a lovely li...

  • Jay

    Such a good read! Ellen Meloy was often personal, frequently poignant, and always fascinating. Her observations about small town Utah life (she lived in Bluff) were as engaging as was her writings abo...

  • Ben

    I wanted to like this. The subject, bighorn sheep in the Southwest, is interesting to me, and I want to learn more about them. I love good nature writing. But while a lot of the writing is good, a fai...