The Unit

The Unit Review

One day in early spring, Dorrit Weger is checked into the Second Reserve Bank Unit for biological material. She is promised a nicely furnished apartment inside the Unit, where she will make new friends, enjoy the state of the art recreation facilities, and live the few remaining days of her life in comfort with people who are just like her. Here, women over the age of fifty and men over sixty-single, childless, and without jobs in progressive industries--are sequestered for their final few years; they are considered outsiders.

In the Unit they are expected to contribute themselves for drug and psychological testing, and ultimately donate their organs, little by little, until the final donation. Despite the ruthless nature of this practice, the ethos of this near-future society and the Unit is to take care of others, and Dorrit finds herself living under very pleasant conditions: well-housed, well-fed, and well-attended. She is resigned to her fate and discovers her days there to be rather consoling and peaceful.

But when she meets a man inside the Unit and falls in love, the extraordinary becomes a reality and life suddenly turns unbearable. Dorrit is faced with compliance or escape, and...well, then what?

Title:The Unit
Edition Language:English

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    Some Testimonial About This Book:

  • karen

    hmmm. so this was supposed to be for my "october is dystopian/apocalyptic month". and for most people, this book would definitely fall on the dystopian side of things. am i crazy for thinking i could ...

  • Zoeytron

    For women turning 50 (60 for men), it is the beginning of the end. You have no children, no partner, no one depending on you. You have just become officially dispensable. You are about to be installed...

  • Brad

    The Unit is billed as a Sci-Fi dystopia. If so, it's just barely so. It's speculative with a lower case "s" but little more than that.Told in the first person by Dorrit Weger -- the most insipid, path...

  • Paquita Maria Sanchez

    Cool, so not everything creepy that comes out of Sweden is good. I don't mean to delight in someone else's failure or proudly self-identify as 'Murican or anything, but I'm only human, and Sweden was ...

  • Denae

    The Unit is the saddest piece of dystopian fiction I have ever read. Normally the genre leaves me angry or frightened or feeling the need for a good shower, but this made me feel heartbroken. The Unit...

  • Blair

    In the world this novel portrays, the 'dispensable' are sent to live in self-contained communities known as 'units'. Being dispensable means you are over 50 (if you're a woman) or 60 (if you're a man)...

  • Suzanne (Chick with Books) Yester

    Ninni Holmqvist's novel is compelling and disturbing at the same time. From the first turn of the page I was drawn into the futuristic world where childless women who have reached the age 50 and child...

  • JBP

    This was nearly a five star book for me and I don't give those out very often--probably only a few of them in the hundreds of books I've rated since starting this a few years ago. The only reason it d...

  • Chaitra

    There are cases where I don't agree with the premise of a book, either because of my hangups or because it seems far out, and I still like the book. That's not the case with this book. It was distract...

  • Misha

    Meh. There's an interesting idea at the heart of this book, a sort of Logan's Run kind of idea, that asks "What if childless people were considered so worthless by society they just become living orga...